High school guidance counselors and college aid officers are there to help students plan for a successful future and find financial aid. They provide individualized advice based on a student’s academic and financial situation. A counselor will also be aware of scholarships, financial aid, or tuition-assistance programs specific to a student’s school, community, or state.
If you are eligible for a loan or Pell Grant and did not register in time for a book authorization, you must contact your campus Financial Aid Office to see if you are eligible to have one processed. Book Allowances are available on the first day of classes for each part of term within each payment period. Please check with your local campus Office of Financial Aid for dates and eligibility.
Yes, you may have some out-of-pocket expenses while waiting to receive your aid. However, if you are eligible for aid, register early, and have funds remaining after tuition/fees are deducted, we will process a book charge authorization for you. This book authorization will be deducted from your awards before refunds are made. If it is not used, it will be credited back to your account before refunds are processed. If you do not wish to have a book charge authorization processed, you must notify us in writing and we will cancel it.
Filing your FAFSA gets the ball rolling on lots of financial aid opportunities, but additional grants are available that might require separate applications.  Your state and other grant foundations put forth narrowly defined student gift aid every year.  Your location, ethnic background, and even your parents’ employer could lead you to the college grant funding you need.
Some college grant programs are open to all students regardless of background or field of study. These are considered General Grants, and typically are decided according to financial need and academic performance. A great number of college grants, however, are designed to target specific portions of the population or students pursuing particular degrees or career paths. These can be broken down into the following categories.

Many grants dedicated to specific career paths are, in fact, award-for-service programs. These programs perform two functions; they give much needed financial aid to talented students pursuing careers in high need fields, and they help to secure and retain talented professionals in communities that are experiencing critical manpower shortages. Students entering into a grant-for-service program should understand that they are agreeing to a binding contract, and will be obligated to fulfill all the of the particulars of that contract. Students who fail to meet their award-for-service obligations will find that their grants will revert to standard student loans, and they will be expected to repay all monies received plus interest.
Once you receive your SAR, you must contact the Financial Aid Office to see if any information is needed to complete your financial aid file. The information from your SAR will be forwarded electronically to EFSC but it may be necessary to submit additional documentation. Your SAR is not a financial aid award. EFSC will send you an Award Notice informing you of the aid for which you are eligible.
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